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“Women During the Civil War” on April 9 at Tiskilwa’s Museum on Main

April 5, 2018

Monday, April 9, 2018, marks the 153rd anniversary of Lee’s historic surrender to Grant at Appomattox.  In a program beginning at 7:00 p.m. in the Community Room, Tiskilwa Historical Society will welcome noted Civil War historian Christina Lea Smith to the Museum on Main.

 

Using photos, facts, and narrative examples, Christina will present the story of “Women During the Civil War.” In a PowerPoint program suitable for audience of all ages, Christina will concentrate on ways in which the Civil War dramatically affected the lives of American women as well as the entire nation.

 

Most history buffs are aware that a number of women disguised themselves as men and joined the fight.  But many women also served as spies and nurses. Thousands of enslaved women started the transition to freedom, beginning new lives amidst the horrors of war. 

 

During the war, women in both the North and South took on new roles at home after their husbands, brothers, and fathers responded to the call to arms.  After the war ended, American life was never again the same.

 

With twenty years of teaching experience in Illinois colleges, Christina Lea Smith holds a master’s degree in history from Illinois State University and is currently working on a second master’s degree in Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana.  

 

Following the program, the society will provide refreshments and host a social time in the galleries.  Everyone is invited to join us for this fascinating look into a little-known aspect of our American journey.

 

Photo:  On April 9, historian Christina Lea Smith will present “Women During the Civil War” at Tiskilwa Historical Society.  One way that women found to serve their country was to cut their hair and enlist, as did the brave soldier pictured here.  

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